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Decorated 5th Marines
 
Private First Class, Adlesperger, Christopher S, .U.S. Marine Corps
Company K, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, RCT 1, 1st Marine Division
Date of Action: November 10, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Christopher S. Adlesperger, Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Rifleman, Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, FIRST Marine Division in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 10 November 2004. As Private First Class Adlesperger made entry into a house in the Jolan District of A1 Fallujah, during Operation AL FAJR, his squad received a heavy volume of enemy machinegun fire from a well-prepared entrenched machine gun position. These fires instantly killed the point man, and injured another Marine and the platoon corpsman. Exposed to heavy enemy machine gun fire and grenades, Private First Class Adlesperger immediately attacked the enemy with rifle fire. While doing so, he suffered a fragmentation wound from enemy grenades. With the majority of his platoon pinned down by insurgent positions, Private First Class Adlesperger single--handedly cleared stairs and a roof top to move the injured to a rooftop where they could receive medical attention. On his own initiative, while deliberately exposing himself to heavy enemy fire, he established a series of firing positions and attacked the enemy, forcing them to be destroyed in place or to move into an area where adjacent forces could engage them. Disregarding his own wounds and physical exhaustion, Private First Class Adlesperger rejoined his platoon and demanded to take the point for a final assault on the same machine gun position. Once an Assault Amphibian Vehicle created a breach in the wall adjacent to the enemy's position, Private First Class Adlesperger was the first Marine to re-enter the courtyard where he eliminated a remaining insurgent at close range. When the fighting finally ceased, a significant number of insurgents from fortified positions had been eradicated. Through his actions, Private First Class Adlesperger destroyed the last
strongpoint in the Jolan District of A1 Fallujah, and saved the lives of his fellow Marines. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Private First Class Adlesperger reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


First Lieutenant Chontosh, Brian R. USMC
Navy Cross
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the
NAVY CROSS to
FIRST LIEUTENANT BRIAN R. CHONTOSH
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
for service as set forth in the following
CITATION:

For extraordinary heroism as Combined Anti-Armor Platoon Commander, Weapons Company, 3 Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 25 March 2003. While leading his platoon north on Highway I toward Ad Diwaniyah, First Lieutenant Chontosh’s platoon moved into a coordinated ambush of mortars, rocket propelled grenades, and automatic weapons fire. With coalition tanks blocking the road ahead, he realized his platoon was caught in a kill zone. He had his driver move the vehicle through a breach along his flank, where he was immediately taken under fire from an entrenched machine gun. Without hesitation, First Lieutenant Chontosh ordered the driver to advance directly at the enemy position enabling his .50 caliber machine gunner to silence the enemy. He then directed his driver into the enemy trench, where he exited his vehicle and began to clear the trench with an M16A2 service rifle and 9 millimeter pistol. His ammunition depleted, First Lieutenant Chontosh, with complete disregard for his safety, twice picked up discarded enemy rifles and continued his ferocious attack. When a Marine following him found an enemy rocket propelled grenade launcher, First Lieutenant Chontosh used it to destroy yet another group of enemy soldiers. When his audacious attack ended, he had cleared over 200 meters of the enemy trench, killing more than 20 enemy soldiers and wounding several others. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Chontosh reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Corporal Clairday, Jason S., U.S. Marine Corps
Company K, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, RCT 1, 1st Marine Division
Date of Action: December 12, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Jason S. Clairday, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Fire Team Leader, 1st Squad, 2d Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, FIRST Marine Division, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 12 December 2004. While conducting a security sweep in the Askari District of Al Fallujah, a platoon-sized insurgent force engaged 3d Platoon. Corporal Clairday immediately repositioned his men and jumped a four foot gap three stories up onto the roof of the enemy stronghold where a mortally wounded Marine lay, isolated by the enemy. After throwing several fragmentation grenades, Corporal Clairday fiercely led the attack into the house. He was immediately hit with enemy AK-47 rifle fire in both legs and fell into the kill zone. Under heavy enemy fire, he continued to aggressively engage the enemy while extracting himself from the doorway. Without regard for his own wounds, he rejoined the squad making entry and entered the house a second time. Once inside, he took control of the stack and repositioned himself in the front while suppressing the enemy using fragmentation grenades and his rifle. Again, without concern for his own safety, Corporal Clairday led the Marines into the room where he single-handedly attacked the insurgents and received mortal wounds. His courageous actions enabled reinforcing assault elements to destroy the insurgent position. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Corporal Clairday reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Sergeant Kraft, Jarret A. USMC
Navy Cross
Sergeant Jarrett A. Kraft
U.S. Marine Corps
Citation:

The Navy Cross is presented to Jarrett A. Kraft, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Squad Leader, 81-millimeter Mortar Platoon, Weapons Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 1, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 23 December 2004. As numerically superior insurgent forces attacked Sergeant Kraft and the Marines in Al Fallujah, Iraq, he quickly organized and fearlessly led three assault forces on three separate attacks to repel the insurgents and ensure the successful advance of the battalion. With complete disregard for his own life, he placed himself between intense enemy fire and the men during each attack providing suppressive fire and leadership to sustain the fight and eliminate the enemy. Although grenades thrown by the insurgents rendered him momentarily unconscious during one assault, this did not dampen his spirit or determination. Undeterred, Sergeant Kraft continued to lead from the front, despite being wounded himself. On two more occasions, he was knocked down stairwells by enemy grenade blasts and finally while emplacing a sniper in a critical location, Sergeant Kraft was knocked down by the blast from a friendly M1A1 tank main gun. He demonstrated courageous leadership with a complete disregard for his own safety, during this desperate two-hour battle as he personally braved multiple enemy small arms kill zones to render assistance and guidance to his Marines. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Sergeant Kraft reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

MARTINEZ, MARCO A.
Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 12, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Marco A. Martinez, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as 1st Fire Team Leader, 2d Squad, 1st Platoon, Company G, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, First Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 12 April 2003. Responding to a call to reinforce his Platoon that was ambushed, Corporal Martinez effectively deployed his team under fire in supporting positions for a squad assault. After his squad leader was wounded, he took control and led the assault through a tree line where the ambush originated. As his squad advanced to secure successive enemy positions, it received sustained small arms fire from a nearby building. Enduring intense enemy fire and without regard for his own personal safety, Corporal Martinez launched a captured enemy rocket propelled grenade into the building temporarily silencing the enemy and allowing a wounded Marine to be evacuated and receive medical treatment. After receiving additional fire, he single-handedly assaulted the building and killed four enemy soldiers with a grenade and his rifle. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Corporal Martinez reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. (May 3, 2004) -- Marine Sgt. Marcos A. Martinez received the Navy Cross from the Secretary of the Navy, Honorable Gordon R. England, during a ceremony Monday at 5th Marine Regiment parade deck here.

"These brave Marines did good things without notice," said England, "and without the acclaim of crowds. But they got the acclaim of their fellow Marines."
Martinez, 22, a Las Cruces, N.M., native, received the naval service's second highest award for extraordinary heroism while serving as first fire team leader for 2nd squad, 1st Platoon, Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom April 12, 2003. The Medal of Honor is the highest military award.

A corporal at the time, Martinez responded to a call to reinforce 1st Platoon, which was under attack by enemy forces. Under fire, Martinez deployed his team in supporting positions for a squad assault.

He assumed control after his squad leader was wounded. While other Marines tended to the wounded squad leader, Martinez single-handedly assaulted the building and killed four enemy soldiers with a grenade and his rifle.

"All of the training is what helped me out," said Martinez. "I relied on my training."

Lance Corporal Perez, Joseph B. USMC
Navy Cross
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the NAVY CROSS to
LANCE CORPORAL JOSEPH B. PEREZ
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
for service as set forth in the following
CITATION:

For extraordinary heroism as Rifleman, Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 4 April 2003. While clearing near Route 6 during the advance into Baghdad, 1st Platoon came under intense enemy fire. As the point man for the lead squad and the most exposed member of the platoon, Lance Corporal Perez came under the majority of these fires. Without hesitation, he continuously employed his M16A4 rifle to destroy the enemy while calmly directing accurate fires for his squad. He led the charge down a trench destroying the enemy and while closing and under tremendous enemy fire, threw a grenade into a trench that the enemy was occupying. While under a heavy volume of fire, Lance Corporal Perez fired an AT-4 rocket into a machine gun bunker, completely destroying it and killing four enemy personnel. His actions enabled the squad to maneuver safely to the enemy position and seize it. In an effort to link up with 3d Platoon on his platoon’s left flank, Lance Corporal Perez continued to destroy enemy combatants with precision rifle fire. As he worked his way to the left, he was hit by enemy fire, sustaining gunshot wounds to his torso and shoulder. Despite being seriously injured, Lance Corporal Perez directed the squad to take cover and gave the squad accurate fire direction to the enemy that enabled the squad to reorganize and destroy the enemy. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Perez reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Corporal Workman, Jeremiah W. USMC
Navy Cross
Corporal Jeremiah W. Workman
U.S. Marine Corps
Citation:

The Navy Cross is presented to Jeremiah W. Workman, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Squad Leader, Mortar Platoon, Weapons Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 1, 1st Marine Division, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 23 December 2004. During clearing operations in Al Fallujah, Iraq, Corporal Workman displayed exceptional situational awareness while organizing his squad to enter a building to retrieve isolated Marines inside. Despite heavy resistance from enemy automatic weapons fire, and a barrage of grenades, Corporal Workman fearlessly exposed himself and laid down a base of fire that allowed the isolated Marines to escape. Outside the house, he rallied the rescued Marines and directed fire onto insurgent positions as he aided wounded Marines in a neighboring yard. After seeing these Marines to safety, he led another assault force into the building to eliminate insurgents and extract more Marines. Corporal Workman again exposed himself to enemy fire while providing cover fire for the team when an enemy grenade exploded directly in front of him causing shrapnel wounds to his arms and legs. Corporal Workman continued to provide intense fire long enough to recover additional wounded Marines and extract them from the besieged building. Although injured, he led a third assault into the building, rallying his team one last time to extract isolated Marines before M1A1 tanks arrived to support the battle. Throughout this fight, Corporal Workman's heroic actions contributed to the elimination of 24 insurgents. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Corporal Workman reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Other Navy Cross recipients:

Sgt. Willie L. Copeland III, team leader 2nd Plt, B Co, 1st Recon Bn, 1st Mar Div
1stSgt. Bradley A. Kasal, Wpns Co 1stSgt. 3/1, 1st Mar Div, I MEF Nov. 14, 2004
GySgt. Justin D. Lehew Amphibious Assault Plt Sgt., A Co, 1/2, I MEF March 23 and 24, 2003
Cpl. Robert Mitchell Jr, Squad Ldr, K Co, 3/1, 1st Mar Div, I MEF, Nov. 13, 2004
Capt. Brent L. Morel, Plt Com 1st Recon Bn, 1st Mar Div, posthumously
Sgt. Anthony Viggiani, Squad Ldr, C Co, BLT, 1/6, II MEF, June 3, 2004

Silver Star 

BOHR, JEFFREY E., JR.
Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 5th RCT, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 10, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Jeffrey E. Bohr, Jr., Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Company Gunnery Sergeant, Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 5, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 10 April 2003. With his company assigned the dangerous mission of seizing a presidential palace in Baghdad and concerned that logistical re-supply might be slow in reaching his comrades once they reached the objective, Gunnery Sergeant Bohr selflessly volunteered to move in his two soft- skinned vehicles with the company's main armored convoy. While moving through narrow streets toward the objective, the convoy took intense small arms and rocket propelled grenade fire. Throughout this movement, Gunnery Sergeant Bohr delivered accurate, effective fires on the enemy while encouraging his Marines and supplying critical information to his company commander. When the lead vehicles of the convoy reached a dead end and were subjected to enemy fire, Gunnery Sergeant Bohr continued to boldly engage the enemy while calmly maneuvering his Marines to safety. Upon learning of a wounded Marine in a forward vehicle, Gunnery Sergeant Bohr immediately coordinated medical treatment and evacuation. Moving to the position of the injured Marine, Gunnery Sergeant Bohr continued to lay down a high volume of suppressive fire, while simultaneously guiding the medical evacuation vehicle, until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Gunnery Sergeant Bohr reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


GySgt. Jeffrey E. Bohr, Jr., Silver Star KIA A Co GySgt, 1/5, 1st Mar Div, I MEF

Marine Corps base Camp Pendleton, Calif. (May 3, 2004) -- Lori Bohr, wife of Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jeffrey E. Bohr, Jr., who was killed in action April 10, 2003, accepted the Silver Star on behalf of her husband from the Secretary of the Navy, Honorable Gordon R. England, during a ceremony Monday at 5th Marine Regiment parade deck here.

"These brave Marines did good things without notice," said England, "and without the acclaim of crowds. But they got the acclaim of their fellow Marines."
Bohr, an Ossian, Iowa, native, received the military's third-highest award for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as the Alpha Company gunnery sergeant, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on April 10, 2003.

With his company assigned the dangerous mission of seizing a presidential palace in Baghdad and concerned that logistical resupply might be slow in reaching his comrades once they reached the objective, Bohr selflessly volunteered to move in his two soft-skinned vehicles with the company's main armored convoy.
While moving through narrow streets toward the objective, the convoy took intense small-arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Throughout this movement, Bohr delivered accurate, effective fires on the enemy while encouraging his Marines and supplying critical information to his company commander.

When the lead vehicles of the convoy reached the dead end and were subjected to enemy fire, Bohr continued to boldly engage the enemy while calmly maneuvering his Marines to safety. Upon learning of a wounded Marine in a forward vehicle, Bohr immediately coordinated medical treatment and evacuation.
Moving to the position of the injured Marine, Bohr continued to lay down a high volume of suppressive fire, while simultaneously guiding the medical evacuation vehicle, until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire.

"I've supported everything he and the Marine Corps does," said Lori Bohr. "This means a lot."

Established in 1918, the Silver Star is awarded to a person who is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The required gallantry, while of a lesser degree than that required for award of the Distinguished Service Cross, must nevertheless have been performed with marked distinction.

Ossian, Iowa native, Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Jeffrey E. Bohr Jr., 39, has posthumously received the Silver Star May 3, 2004. His wife, Lori, accepted the medal on her husband's behalf from secretary of the Navy, Honorable Gordon England during an award ceremony held on Camp Pendleton. Bohr died in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in northern Baghdad April 10, 2003. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment out of Camp Pendleton. He was the Alpha Company gunnery sergeant for 1/5. Photo by: Cpl. Luis R. Agostini

DESGROSSEILLIERS, TODD S.
Major, U.S. Marine Corps
Task Force Bruno, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, RCT 1, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: December 12 - 23, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Todd S. Desgrosseilliers, Major, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Officer-in-Charge, Task Force BRUNO, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 1, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM II from 12 to 23 December 2004. On 12 December, Major Desgrosseilliers was leading Task Force BRUNO in clearing operations when several Marines became trapped inside a building by intense enemy fire. During the engagement, an enemy grenade landed in the midst of the Marines. With complete disregard for his own safety, Major Desgrosseilliers shielded them from the explosion with his own body. Ignoring shrapnel wounds, he rallied his Marines and directed grenade, heavy machine gun and tank fire to destroy the 15 insurgents in the house. On 23 December, Task Force BRUNO came under heavy enemy fire while conducting operations in hostile territory. Throughout the firefight, he personally cleared several rooms and eliminated insurgents with rifle and grenade fire. When one of the Marines was seriously wounded he exposed himself to direct enemy fire and helped drag him to safety. Despite being wounded again with shrapnel during the firefight, he remained in the open to direct a devastating volume of tank main gunfire until the enemy was destroyed. In this engagement, 30 insurgents were killed including key terrorist leadership. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Major Desgrosseilliers reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

SSgt. USMC EVERS, CHARLES M.
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles M. Evers, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Platoon Commander, 3d Platoon, India Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 5, I Marine Expeditionary Force Forward, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM from 8 June to 12 June 2006. During this period, Staff Sergeant Evers' beleaguered platoon was attacked by a determined platoon-sized enemy force closing in from three separate directions, attempting to dislodge them from their observation post, and due to his personal example and decisive combat leadership, each attack was decidedly defeated. Staff Sergeant Evers, with complete disregard for his own safety, continuously braved intense enemy machine gun and small arms fire in order to provide an accurate assessment and better direct his platoon's fires. The positions the Marines had deliberately prepared under Staff Sergeant Evers' watchful eye withstood rocket propelled grenade detonations and thousands of enemy machine gun rounds. The enemy's detonation of a suicide vehicle-borne improvised explosive device did not deter the fighting spirit that Staff Sergeant Evers instilled in his Marines, and they executed their well-rehearsed battle drill to gain fire superiority over the enemy insurgents. His expert use of supporting arms to include close air support and tank main gun broke the back of the tenacious attackers. Staff Sergeant Evers' resolute, decisive action, and refusal to submit to the enemy's will embodies the ethos of a combat leader and ensured the platoon's position would be held. By his bold initiative, undaunted courage, and complete dedication to duty, Staff Sergeant Evers reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

GLOVER, JOSHUA L.
First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps
Quick Reaction Force Platoon, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 13, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joshua L. Glover, First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Quick Reaction Force Platoon Commander, First Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, FIRST Marine Division, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 13 April 2004. First Lieutenant Glover's platoon executed a mechanical recovery of a downed CH-53 helicopter southeast of Al Fallujah, Iraq. After successfully securing the aircraft's classified material, the platoon was attacked by an enemy platoon-sized element employing machine gun, small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Despite coordinated enemy fire, First Lieutenant Glover skillfully maneuvered his force and assaulted through the ambush to friendly lines while inflicting numerous enemy casualties. That evening, he was tasked to recover a destroyed Assault Amphibious Vehicle and rescue a besieged rifle platoon deep behind enemy lines. While en route, he led an engagement against a company-sized force along the enemy's main line of resistance. First Lieutenant Glover repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as he engaged enemy targets at point-blank range while directing the rifle platoon's relief and coordinating recovery operations. By his courageous actions, personal initiative, and loyal devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Glover reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

GUARDIOLA, SAMUEL
Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Weapons Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, RCT 1, 1st Marine Division
Date of Action: December 23, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Samuel Guardiola, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Section Leader, Mortar Platoon, Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 1, FIRST Marine Division, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 23 December 2004. While searching for enemy weapons caches, Sergeant Guardiola's section was ambushed by insurgents occupying well-fortified positions. Realizing that they were trapped in the impact zone, he exposed himself to intense enemy fire in order to reorganize and consolidate his Marines. Upon discovering two of his Marines were isolated inside a building, he gathered an assault force to recover them. Sergeant Guardiola used the adjacent rooftop to access the building and reach the Marines inside, while constantly under small arms and grenade fire. Once inside, he found his fallen comrades and immediately planned their evacuation. As the enemy assaulted with a fragmentation grenade, he covered the Marines with his own body to shield them from the enemy grenade, which did not detonate. Despite intense enemy fire, Sergeant Guardiola carried one fallen Marine down three flights of stairs, clearing rooms along the way with his 9 millimeter pistol. Although exhausted and dehydrated, he continued to carry his comrade to the evacuation point. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty. Sergeant Guardiola reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

HORTON, NICHOLAS J.
Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps
Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 10, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Nicholas J. Horton, Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Third Platoon Commander, Alpha Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 10 April 2003. While conducting a mission along Route 2 into the heart of downtown Baghdad, Second Lieutenant Horton's Battalion was attacked from both sides of the road. He directed suppressive fires while continuing towards the objective. As Alpha Company attacked through an enemy position it encountered a dead-end and began taking intense rocket-propelled grenades (RPG) and small arms fire. Second Lieutenant Horton directed his platoon to return fire, effectively suppressing the enemy. He subsequently took over navigation for the company and led them out of the kill zone. In a subsequent firefight, his track was hit causing casualties in the troop compartment and setting off the halon system. He quickly calmed the Marines and reoriented their fire to suppress the enemy. Continuing the advance, Third Platoon was tasked with clearing a Mosque. After establishing suppression and a mechanical breach into the complex, Second Lieutenant Horton assessed the situation and requested Second Platoon. Second Lieutenant Horton directed their actions, intermingling them with his own platoon in order to clear the multi-story complex. His assault led to the capture of 20 enemy prisoners of war, 14 RPGs, numerous machine guns and small arms. He executed the entire action inside the Mosque without physical on-scene guidance from the Company Commander. By his bold leadership, outstanding judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Second Lieutenant Horton reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

KERMAN, ROBERT P.
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Weapons Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: March 25, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert P. Kerman, Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Rifleman, Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, on 25 March 2003, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Lance Corporal Kerman exhibited exceptional bravery when the lead elements of the battalion were ambushed with mortars, rocket propelled grenade, and automatic weapons fire. As the vehicle he was traveling in drove directly into machine gun fire and into a trench line, Lance Corporal Kerman sprang from the vehicle and began assaulting down the enemy occupied trench with two other Marines. As enemy soldiers fired at him, he fearlessly plunged towards them firing his M-16 with lethal accuracy. Continuing to move through the trench he repeatedly came under enemy fire. Each time he would calmly occupy a steady firing position and take well-aimed shots that had devastating effects on the enemy. As the group ran out of ammunition, they pressed forward 200 to 300 meters utilizing captured enemy AK- 47s. Lance Corporal Kerman showed no regard for his own personal safety, and his actions directly contributed to the successful outcome of the engagement. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Lance Corporal Kerman reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


Cpl. Robert P. Kerman, Silver Star rifleman Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, 3/5, 1st Mar Div, I MEF

Marine Corps base Camp Pendleton, Calif. (May 6, 2004) -- Marine Cpl. Robert P. Kerman received the Silver Star from the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, Gen. Michael W. Hagee, during an awards ceremony Thursday at Marine Air Ground Combat Training Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif.

Kerman, 21, a Klamath Falls, Ore., native, received the military's third-highest award for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a rifleman for Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on March 25, 2003.

Three other Marines received medals for valor at the same ceremony. "They are the reflection of the Marine Corps type who's service to the Marine Corps and country is held above their own safety and lives," said Gen. Hagee, commenting on the four Marines who received medals during the ceremony. "I'm proud to be here awarding the second highest and third highest awards for bravery to these great Marines."

"These four Marines are a reflection of every Marine and sailor in this great battalion," said Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, Sgt. Maj. John L. Estrada.
Kerman exhibited exceptional bravery when the lead elements of the battalion were ambushed with mortars, rocket propelled grenades and automatic weapons fire.

As the vehicle he was traveling in drove directly into machine gun fire and into a trench line, Kerman sprang from the vehicle and began assaulting down the enemy occupied trench with two other Marines. As the enemy soldiers fired at him, he fearlessly plunged towards them firing his M16 with lethal accuracy. Continuing to move through the trench he repeatedly came under enemy fire.

Each time he would calmly occupy a steady firing position and take well-aimed shots that had devastating effects in the enemy.

As the group ran out of ammunition, they pressed forward 200 to 300 meters utilizing captured enemy AK-47s.

He showed no regard for his own personal safety, and his actions directly contributed to the successful outcome of the engagement.

"I was pretty scared at the time, but we knew what we had to do and we did it," said Kerman. "I did not expect (the award), maybe I just did the right thing."
Established in 1918, the Silver Star is awarded to a person who is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The required gallantry, while of a lesser degree than that required for award of the Distinguished Service Cross, must nevertheless have been performed with marked distinction.

Marine Cpl. Robert P. Kerman received the Silver Star from the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, Gen. Michael W. Hagee, during an awards ceremony Thursday at Marine Air Ground Combat Training Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif.

Kerman, 21, a Klamath Falls, Ore., native, received the military's third-highest award for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a rifleman for Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on March 25, 2003. Photo by: Cpl Jeremy Vought

KIRK, JEFFREY L.
Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Company K, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, RCT 1, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: November 10, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Jeffrey L. Kirk, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as First Squad Leader, Third Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 1, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 10 November 2004. While Sergeant Kirk and his squad gained entry into a building, insurgents threw a grenade from a room containing a hardened machine gun position. Sergeant Kirk quickly organized and led Marines from multiple squads across an open courtyard to eliminate the threat. Effective enemy small arms fire forced him and the other Marines to withdraw to a covered position while returning fire with grenades and small arms. Unfazed, Sergeant Kirk re-grouped his men behind cover and attacked the building a second time. Although wounded as he approached the position, he continued to attack by throwing a grenade into the room and then eliminating the enemy machine gunner with a rifle. Enemy fire and grenades again erupted from the same room. Sergeant Kirk and the Marines withdrew once more, throwing grenades in their wake. Refusing medical attention, he remained as the point man and led the Marines in for a third assault on the enemy position. He quickly overwhelmed and destroyed the remaining insurgents, clearing the building to the roof. His extraordinary actions in the face of great danger destroyed a key defensive position and prevented the enemy from inflicting serious casualties on other Marines. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Sergeant Kirk reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

LILLEY, JASON M.
Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 7, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jason M. Lilley, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as a Rifleman, Second Platoon, Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM II on 7 April 2004. In the Al Anbar Province, Iraq, 60 enemy personnel in fortified positions ambushed Corporal Lilley's 25-man reconnaissance platoon instantly wounding six Marines and disabling two vehicles. When his team executed immediate action to flank the enemy machine gun positions, Corporal Lilley dismounted his vehicle and, while under intense enemy machine gun and small arms fire charged forward across a shallow canal and up to a berm. After disposing two well-armed insurgents attempting to flee for cover, he was ordered to go back over the berm and support the withdrawal of another team. With disregard for his own safety and under withering enemy fire, he assaulted and single-handedly neutralized three more insurgents at point-blank range. The vigorous assault of his hastily-formed three-man assault team accounted for the destruction of enemy forces, and saved the lives of six fellow Marines. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Corporal Lilley reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

MCCARVER, ABRAHAM
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 13, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Abraham McCarver, Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Rifleman, Second Platoon, Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM II on 13 April 2004. During an attack on enemy forces, the amphibious assault vehicle in which Lance Corporal McCarver and his platoon were riding became disabled by enemy fire, forcing them to take cover in a nearby house. During their movement, Lance Corporal McCarver expertly provided cover fire for the rest of the Marines. Upon reaching the house, it was learned that his platoon commander was severely wounded and still in the burning vehicle. Disregarding his own safety, Lance Corporal McCarver ran through a hail of enemy fire and assisted his platoon sergeant with the rescue. Over the next hour, Lance Corporal McCarver assisted the corpsman in providing first aid, and constantly moved to various locations under fire. With his ammunition supply exhausted, Lance Corporal McCarver collected ammunition from various positions and continued the assault. When the quick reaction force arrived, he secured additional ammunition and provided cover for his Marines to recover the disabled amphibious assault vehicle. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Lance Corporal McCarver reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

MCCORMICK, ARMAND E.
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, Weapons Company, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: March 25, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Armand E. McCormick, Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Rifleman, Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 25 March 2003. Lance Corporal McCormick exhibited exceptional bravery when the lead elements of his battalion were ambushed with mortars, rocket propelled grenades, and automatic weapons fire. Under heavy fire, he fearlessly drove his lightly armored vehicle directly at an enemy machine gun position and purposely crashed it into an occupied trench line. With the initial breach of the enemy defense now gained for his unit, he sprang from the vehicle and began assaulting down the berm and ambush line with two Marines. Taking direct fire, and outnumbered, he pressed forward firing his M-9 pistol at enemy forces. Moving through the trench he repeatedly came under enemy fire, each time calmly taking well-aimed shots. As the group ran low on ammunition, he collected enemy rifles and a rocket propelled grenade and continued to press the attack forward several hundred meters. As a follow on company began to make their entrance into the berm, he returned to his vehicle and backed it out of the trench. Lance Corporal McCormick's courageous and boldly aggressive actions greatly reduced the enemy's ability to inflict casualties on the rest of his battalion. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Lance Corporal McCormick reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


Cpl. Armand E. McCormick, Silver Star rifleman Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, Wpns Co, 3/5, 1st Mar Div, I MEF

Marine Corps base Camp Pendleton, Calif. (May 6, 2004) -- Marine Cpl. Armand E. McCormick, 22, received the Silver Star Medal from the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, Gen. Michael W. Hagee, during an awards ceremony May 5 at Marine Air Ground Combat Training Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif.
McCormick, a Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, native, received the military's third-highest award for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as rifleman for Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on March 25, 2003.

Three other Marines received medals for valor at the same ceremony. "They are the reflection of the Marine Corps type who's service to the Marine Corps and country is held above their own safety and lives," said Gen. Hagee, commenting on the four Marines who received medals during the ceremony. "I'm proud to be here awarding the second highest and third highest awards for bravery to these great Marines."

"These four Marines are a reflection of every Marine and sailor in this great battalion," said Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, Sgt. Maj. John L. Estrada.
Under heavy fire McCormick, a lance corporal at the time, exhibited exceptional bravery when the lead elements of his battalion were ambushed with mortars, rocket propelled grenades, and squad automatic weapons fire. Fearlessly he drove his lightly armored vehicle directly at an enemy machine gun position and purposely crashed it into an occupied trench line.

With the initial breach of the enemy defense now gained for his unit, he sprang from the vehicle and began assaulting the berm and ambush line with two Marines. Taking direct fire, and outnumbered, he pressed forward, firing his M9 pistol at enemy forces. Moving through the trench, he repeatedly came under enemy fire, each time

calmly taking well-aimed shots. As the group ran low on ammunition, he collected enemy rifles and a rocket-propelled grenade and continued to press the attack forward several hundred meters. As a follow-on company began to make their entrance into the berm, he returned to his vehicle and backed it out of the trench. McCormick's boldly aggressive actions greatly reduced the enemy's ability to inflict casualties on the rest of his battalion.

"It's an honor of course, it is just another day in the Marine Corps," said McCormick.

"I ready to go it again and help out with the situation," he said about redeploying to Iraq. Consequently, McCormick will be redeploying to Iraq Friday.
"To me I did what I was suppose to do, I did what was expected," he added.

Established in 1918, the Silver Star is awarded to a person who is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The required gallantry, while of a lesser degree than that required for award of the Distinguished Service Cross, must nevertheless have been performed with marked distinction.

Marine Lance Cpl. Armand E. McCormick, 22, received the Silver Star Medal from the Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, Gen. Michael W. Hagee, during an awards ceremony May 5 at Marine Air Ground Combat Training Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif. McCormick, a Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, native, received the military's third-highest award for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as rifleman for Combined Anti-Armor Platoon, Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on March 25, 2003. Photo by: Cpl. Jeremy Vought

RAPICAULT, PATRICK MARC
Captain, U.S. Marine Corps
Weapons Company, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: September 24 - November 15, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Patrick Marc Rapicault, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Company Commander, Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, from 24 September to 15 November 2004. Captain Rapicault courageously led his Marines on the streets of Ar Ramadi, Iraq through 50 firefights and 27 improvised explosive device ambushes. Always leading from the front, he directed the fire and maneuver of his company with complete disregard for his own personal safety. Despite being the first Marine in the Battalion wounded and his company suffering the heaviest casualties during daily street fighting, Captain Rapicault always displayed an infectious enthusiasm that motivated every Marine to fight hard and recover quickly from battle. On every mission, Captain Rapicault's intuitive and calm combat leadership ensured success on the battlefield, with limited damage to vehicles and friendly casualties. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom. Captain Rapicault's bold leadership, courageous actions, and complete dedication to duty reflected great credit upon him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. (Dec. 2, 2005) -- “ He led from the front,” said 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment Bn. commander Lt. Col. Craig S. Kaczynski during Capt. Patrick M. Rapicault’s Silver Star ceremony Dec. 2.

Rapicault assumed command of Weapons Company, 2nd Bn. 5th Marines during his deployment to Iraq while they were in contact with the enemy on 24 September 2004.

As company commander, Rapicault led his Marines through 50 firefights and 27 improvised explosive device ambushes between the time he took command of the unit and until he was killed Nov. 15, 2004.

For his gallantry, Rapicault was posthumously awarded the Silver Star, the nation’s third highest award for combat valor.

His wife, Vera Rapicault, accepted the award on his behalf during the ceremony at 5th Marines memorial park located in Camp San Mateo.

According to the citation, he directed the fire and maneuver of his company with complete disregard to his own personal safety.

Despite being the first Marine wounded in his Battalion and his company suffering the heaviest casualties during the street fighting, Captain Rapicault always displayed an infectious enthusiasm that motivated every Marine to fight hard and recover quickly from battle.

On every mission, Captain Rapicault’s intuitive and calm combat leadership ensured success on the battlefield, which limited damage to vehicles and friendly casualties.

Also according to the citation, He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.

“I was 200 meters away when he passed. It was hard because he was ‘that man’,” remembered 1st Lt. Shawn M. Maurer, an infantry officer who served with Rapicault in Iraq.

“My fondest memory of him was his courage, you could see it in his eyes. I could look in his eyes and everything was going to be okay because he was the best Marine Corps officer I’ve ever served with,” Maurer said.

Rapicault’s heroics not only affected his Marines but also reached Marines throughout the 1st Marine Division.

First Marine Division commanding general Maj. Gen. Richard F. Natonski said “We were blessed not only as a country and Marine Corps, but also as 1st Marine Division to have a leader like Capt. Rapicault” during the humble ceremony.

Natonski said Rapicault would never be forgotten.

“He is as alive today as the day he died,” said Lt. Col. Randall P. Newman, former commanding officer of 2nd Bn., 5th Marines. “He is truly the backbone of what the corps is today. His memory goes on forever.”

RUSSELL, DAVID T.
First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps
Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 2d Brigade Combat Team, 2d Marine Division, II MEF
Date of Action: May 3, 2005
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David T. Russell, First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as First Platoon Commander, Weapons Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, Second Brigade Combat Team, SECOND Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 3 May 2005. While Lieutenant Russell led his platoon in the operation of an entry control point in the city of Ramadi, 13 insurgents assaulted his position with small arms, machine guns, and grenades. Realizing the gravity of the attack, he ran to assess the situation from the second deck. First Lieutenant Russell quickly identified an insurgent with a machine gun hiding behind a barrier and killed him with one shot. When he discovered that a Marine isolated in a bunker needed ammunition, he raced to supply him by crossing 75 meters of open area while under fire from at least six insurgents. First Lieutenant Russell purposefully subjected himself to enemy fire to allow one Marine to maneuver and other Marines to destroy the insurgents. He was then knocked to the ground when an enemy round struck his helmet. Suffering from a concussion and bleeding profusely from wounds to his face and arms, First Lieutenant Russell rushed back to direct the fight and establish accountability. Finding two men missing, he rushed across the open area to retrieve a wounded Iraqi soldier. Despite explosions from more than twelve enemy grenades and a stream of machine gun and small arms fire, he moved across the kill zone to personally direct the battle and kill the enemy. Only after being ordered to accept treatment did he submit. First Lieutenant Russell's bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty reflected great credit upon him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

SAGREDO, ISMAEL
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 13, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ismael Sagredo, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Platoon Sergeant, Second Platoon, Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM II on 13 April 2004. Staff Sergeant Sagredo realized the dire nature of the situation when, during an attack on the enemy, elements of the Second Platoon became isolated deep within enemy territory and were forced to abandon their burning Amtrak. He then led his Marines to a nearby house. As his fellow Marines provided cover, he exposed himself to fire as he returned to the burning vehicle to evacuate his platoon commander to safety. Despite continuous rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire, Staff Sergeant Sagredo moved from position to position to establish radio contact with the quick reaction force. His leadership and calm demeanor under fire reassured the Marines and inspired them as they ran low on ammunition. His perseverance was instrumental in gaining radio contact and directing the quick reaction force to his position. Once the reaction force arrived, Staff Sergeant Sagredo moved with complete disregard for his own safety until his platoon commander was evacuated, the Amtrak recovered, and all forces moved to safe positions. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and loyal devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Sagredo reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps an the United States Naval Service.

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. (Nov. 30, 2005) -- First Lt. Christopher D. Ayres and possibly 13 more Marines from his platoon would not be alive today had it not been for the heroic and selfless actions of Gunnery Sgt. Ismael Sagredo.

The 37-year-old from Lansing, Mich., was awarded the Silver Star during a ceremony here Nov. 30.

“We were all caught in a pretty bad situation,” said Ayres, the platoon commander of 2nd Platoon, Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division. “It’s hard to put in words just how thankful I am for what he did that day.”

On the morning of April 13, 2004, elements of 2nd Platoon became isolated deep in enemy territory after pursuing the insurgents that were firing harassing shots earlier that morning.

“There were 13 Marines in an (Assault Amphibious Vehicle) heading down a narrow road in the middle of Fallujah (Iraq),” recalled platoon sergeant with Company B Sagredo. “We started taking rounds and one pierced the engine, slowing down the (AAV) and drenching the Marines inside with oil and hydraulic fluid.”

Realizing the dire nature of the situation, Sagredo urged the AAV crewmembers to push the vehicle as far as it could go while taking heavy small-arms fire with rocket-propelled grenades.

“If we would have stopped there, we would not be here today,” Sagredo said.

Before evacuating the AAV, Sagredo spotted a nearby house and ordered the Marines to take cover in there and lay down suppressing fire. Sagredo himself stayed put in the AAV to ensure all Marines were out of the burning AAV.

Sagredo exposed himself to the enemy in order to move wounded Ayres from the AAV to the safety of the house.

“(Sagredo) is my hero,” said Renee Ayres. “He doesn’t admit it but he is.”

Despite continuous rocket-propelled grenade and small-arms fire, Sagredo moved from position to position to establish radio contact with the quick reaction force, according to his award citation. His leadership and calm demeanor under fire reassured the Marines and inspired them as they ran low on ammunition, said the citation.

The citation said Sagredo’s perseverance was instrumental in gaining radio contact and directing the quick reaction force to his position. Once the reaction force arrived, Sagredo moved with complete disregard for his own safety until his platoon commander was evacuated, the AAV recovered, and all forces moved to safe positions.

“A lot of Marines out there have done so much more than me,” Sagredo said. “All we did was go in and do our jobs as we were trained while trying to get everyone out alive.”

SIKES, ADAM R.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, RCT 5, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 12, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Adam R. Sikes, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Platoon Sergeant, First Platoon, Company G, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental combat Team 5, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 12 April 2003. During the Battle of At Tarmiyah, Staff Sergeant Sikes' platoon was pinned down by heavy small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire in the opening moments of the fight. Without orders, Staff Sergeant Sikes quickly rallied two of his squads and set them into position to suppress the enemy and prepare them to counter attack. With the squads in position, Staff Sergeant Sikes charged alone across 70 meters of fire-swept ground to close on the first enemy strongpoint, which he cleared with a grenade and rifle fire. Moving to the roof of a three-story building that was exposed to enemy fire, Staff Sergeant Sikes skillfully adjusted 60-millimeter mortar rounds into nearby enemy positions. The rounds isolated the town from enemy reinforcement and decimated an enemy position in the nearby tree line. Upon learning that another squad had taken casualties, Staff Sergeant Sikes moved to their position. With wounded Marines in a small compound, cut off by the enemy, Staff Sergeant Sikes signaled an assault amphibian vehicle and directed their evacuation while under a hail of small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Staff Sergeant Sikes reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


SSgt. Adam R. Sikes, Silver Star Plt Sgt 1st Plt, G Co, 2/5, 1st Mar Div, I MEF

Marine Corps base Camp Pendleton, Calif. (May 3, 2004) -- Marine Staff Sgt. Adam R. Sikes received the Silver Star from the Secretary of the Navy, Honorable Gordon R. England, during a ceremony Monday at 5th Marine Regiment parade deck here.

"These brave Marines did good things without notice," said England, "and without the acclaim of crowds. But they got the acclaim of their fellow Marines."

Sikes, 27, an Aliso Viejo, Calif., native, received the military's third-highest award for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as the platoon sergeant for 1st Platoon, Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on April 12, 2003.

During the At Tarmiyah Battle, located 30 kilometers north of Baghdad, Sike's platoon was pinned down by heavy small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire in the opening moments of the fight.

Sikes quickly rallied two of his squads and set them into position to suppress the enemy and prepare them to counterattack. With the squads already in position, Sikes charged across 70 meters of fire-swept ground alone to close in on the first enemy strongpoint, which he cleared with a grenade and his rifle.

Moving to the roof of a three-story building exposed to enemy fire, Sikes adjusted 60-millimeter mortar rounds onto nearby enemy reinforcement positions. The rounds isolated the town from enemy reinforcement and decimated an enemy position in the nearby tree line. After learning that his other squad had taken casualties, he signaled an assault amphibious vehicle and directed their evacuation while under a hail of small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire. "It was a very intense moment," said Sikes. "You don't consider what's going on in the world when everything explodes around you. You want to take care of the Marines to the left and right of you."

Established in 1918, the Silver Star is awarded to a person who is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The required gallantry, while of a lesser degree than that required for award of the Distinguished Service Cross, must nevertheless have been performed with marked distinction.

Aliso Viejo, Calif., native, Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Adam R. Sikes, 27, received the Silver Star May 3, 2004. Sikes received the medal from the Secretary of the Navy, Honorable Gordon England, during an awards ceremony held on Camp Pendleton. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment out of Camp Pendleton. He was the platoon sergeant for 1st Platoon, Golf Company, 2/5.

Photo by: Cpl. Luis R. Agostini

SMITH, JASON E.
Captain, U.S. Marine Corps
Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, RCT 1, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 13, 2004
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jason E. Smith, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Company Commander, Bravo Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Central Command in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM II on 13 April 2004. Captain Smith led a rescue convoy through Al Fallujah to reach elements of Bravo Company that were surrounded by enemy forces and requiring support to evacuate casualties. Lacking accurate location information, Captain Smith used smoke from a burning amphibious assault vehicle to guide his convoy to the stranded platoon. When the rescue convoy slowed due to increased enemy fire, Captain Smith dismounted his vehicle, raced on foot to the front of the column, and led the convoy to the platoon. Disregarding his own personal safety and while exposed to enemy fire, Captain Smith returned fire and coordinated counter-attacks on enemy militia. As he reached the surrounded platoon, Captain Smith assessed the situation, organized a strong defensive perimeter around the platoon, and supervised the evacuation of casualties. Discovering remains of a deceased Marine inside a disabled vehicle, he ordered tanks to tow the vehicle back to the base camp. Captain Smith then coordinated the unit's withdrawal, traveling on foot at the rear of the column until all Marines crossed friendly lines. Captain Smith's calm demeanor and forceful character bolstered the fighting spirit of his Marines. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and dedication to duty, Captain Smith reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

TARDIF, TIMOTHY C.
Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: April 12, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Timothy C. Tardif, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Second Squad Leader, First Platoon, Company G, Second Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 12 April 2003. During the Battle of At Tarmiyah, Corporal Tardif and his squad reinforced First Platoon, which was pinned down in a violent enemy crossfire ambush. Immediately assessing the situation, Corporal Tardif directed Marines to return fire into enemy positions in a town. He identified the location of the enemy and determined the precise point to assault the enemy. Corporal Tardif charged across a road under intense small arms and rocket propelled grenade fire inspiring his Marines to follow his example. Engaged in an intense close-quarters battle, he received significant shrapnel wounds from an enemy grenade. Refusing to be evacuated and disregarding his wounds, Corporal Tardif gallantly led his squad in an assault on an enemy-held compound. After securing the compound, Corporal Tardif received an order to egress and he led his reinforced squad in a fighting withdrawal. After moving 150 meters, Corporal Tardif collapsed from his wounds, unable to continue fighting. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Corporal Tardif reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


Cpl. Timothy C. Tardif, Silver Star 2nd squad leader, 1st Plt, G Co, 2/5, 1st Mar Div, I MEF

Marine Corps base Camp Pendleton, Calif. (May 3, 2004) -- Marine Cpl. Timothy C. Tardif received the Silver Star from the Secretary of the Navy, Honorable Gordon R. England, during a ceremony Monday at 5th Marine Regiment parade deck here.

"These brave Marines did good things without notice," said England, "and without the acclaim of crowds. But they got the acclaim of their fellow Marines."

Tardif, 22, a Huntington Beach, Calif., resident, received the military's third-highest award for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as these 2nd squad leader, 1st Platoon, Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on April 12, 2003.

During the At Tarmiyah Battle, located 30 kilometers north of Baghdad, Tardif and his squad reinforced his platoon, which was pinned down in a violent enemy crossfire ambush.

Immediately assessing the situation, he directed Marines to return fire into enemy positions in a town. He identified the location of the enemy, and determined the precise point in which to assault the enemy.

Tardif then charged across a road under intense small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire, inspiring his Marines to follow his example. Engaged in an intense close-quarters battle, he received shrapnel wounds from an enemy grenade. Tardif refused medical attention and continued leading his squad in an assault on an enemy-held compound.

After securing the compound, Tardif egressed on order and led his reinforced squad in a fighting withdrawal. Tardif collapsed after traveling 150 meters from wounds suffered during fighting.

"This award means a lot to me, personally," said Tardif. "But it's not just about me. It's about my platoon and everyone else out there."

Established in 1918, the Silver Star is awarded to a person who is cited for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force, or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The required gallantry, while of a lesser degree than that required for award of the Distinguished Service Cross, must nevertheless have been performed with marked distinction.

Huntington Beach, Calif., native, Marine Corps Cpl. Timothy C. Tardif, 22, has received the Silver Star May 3, 2004. He accepted the medal from secretary of the Navy, Honorable Gordon England during an award ceremony held on Camp Pendleton. Tardif recieved the Silver Star from actions in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom during fighting north of Baghdad April 12, 2003. He was assigned as 2nd Squad Leader, 1st Platoon, Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division out of Camp Pendleton.

Photo by: Cpl. Luis R. Agostini

TEJEDA, RIAYAN A.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Company K, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 5, 1st Marine Division, I MEF
Date of Action: March 21 - April 11, 2003
Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Riayan A. Tejeda, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Platoon Sergeant, Second Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, Regimental Combat Team 5, FIRST Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operations ENDURING FREEDOM and IRAQI FREEDOM from 21 March to 11 April 2003. During numerous encounters with the enemy while advancing to Baghdad, Staff Sergeant Tejeda aggressively and fearlessly led his Marines. On 3 April 2003, his Company came under intense small arms fire from entrenched Republican Guard positions outside the city of Al Azziaiyah. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Staff Sergeant Tejeda exposed himself to enemy fire and charged into the enemy fortifications, leading his Platoon's assault on enemy positions. He single- handedly cleared one position, killing two Republican Guard soldiers. He then led a fire team to destroy a second enemy position. On 11 April 2003, while conducting a foot mobile combat patrol in the Ur District of Baghdad, his Platoon was ambushed from multiple directions with small arms and rocket-propelled grenades. Taking charge at the head of the formation, he inspired his Marines and directed them to positions to counter the enemy's attack. While bravely leading and fighting beside his Marines, he was stuck by enemy fire and mortally wounded. By his bold leadership, wise judgment, and complete dedication to duty, Staff Sergeant Tejeda reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

Other Marine and Navy Silver Star recipients:
Sgt. Jarred L. Adams, scout sniper, 1/7, 1st Mar Div, I MEF, Jan, 2005
Sgt. Leandro Baptista, 1st Recon Bn, 1st Mar Div, I MEF, April 7, 2004
Capt. Christoper J. Bronzi, CO, G Co, 2/4, 1st Mar Div, I MEF, 6 to 7 April 2004
1st Lt. Thomas E. Cogan, platoon commander for E Co, BLT, 2/4, 31st MEU, June 9, 2005
Sgt. Timothy Connors, Squad Leader, 2d Plt, A Co, 1/8, RCT 7, 1st Mar Div, I MEF, Nov. 10-15, 2004.
LCpl. Carlos Gomez-Perez ,Fire team Ldr, E Co, 2/1, I MEF. April 26, 2004
1st Lt. Jeffery Lee, 3rd Plt Com, Co A, 2nd Tank Bn, w/A Co, 1/8 2nd Mar Div, II MEF, Nov. 8 to Nov. 11, 2004
Pfc. Daniel B. McClenney, 3/6, 2nd Mar Div, Camp Lejeune, N.C. June 24, 2004 KIA
Sgt. Scott C. Montoya, Scout Sniper, Scout Sniper Platoon, 2/23, 1st Mar Div, I MEF, 8 April 2003.
PO 2nd Class Juan M. Rubio, 4th Plt, Small Craft Co, 1st Mar Div, I MEF Jan. 1, 2005
1st Lt. Brian M. Stann, 2nd Mobile Assault Plt Ldr Wpns Co, 3/2, 2nd Mar Div, II MEF, May 8 to 14, 2005
Sgt. David N. Wimberg, Marine Forces Reserve's 3/25, 4th Mar Div, Columbus, Ohio. May 25, 2005 KIA